ethernet

  1. Making & Mending - DIY Ethernet Cables

    Ethernet is one of the most important types of cables today, being used to connect all manner of technology around the world to the Internet. While many stores today have pre-made ethernet cables available, sometimes another option is needed. Users may need a cable in an unusual size or just need to replace a broken connector. This guide will show users how to put an RJ45 connector onto the end of bare ethernet cable.

    Before jumping into the main guide, there is an easy fix if you have a connector where the release tab broke off. When the tab breaks, the cable will not lock into place and have trouble maintaining a connection. This can be easily fixed with a

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  2. Crimp Tools

    Crimp tools, also called crimpers, are used to crimp connectors onto bare wire when assembling a cable. There are a few different versions of crimp tools, depending on how the crimper is made and what type of cable it was designed for.

    How Do Crimp Tools Work?

    Using a crimp tool is fairly simple. First, a cable must be stripped to expose the metal wire inside. Then the metal wire(s) are inserted into the connector. Single conductor cables (coax) are easier to use than multi-wire cables like ethernet or phone lines (additional details below). Once the wires are inserted, put the connector inside the crimp tool and squeeze the handle. The pressure applied by the crimper will tighten the connector to keep it in place.

    Manual vs. Ratchet Crimpers

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  3. American Wire Gauge (AWG)

    American Wire Gauge (AWG)

    What is American Wire Gauge (AWG)?

    American Wire Gauge (AWG, sometimes called the Brown & Sharpe wire gauge) is the standardized wire gauge system used to measure the size of electric conducting wire in the United States since 1857. AWG refers to wire made with a solid metal core. It is represented as a simple number that is calculated by finding the radius of the wire, squaring that number, and multiplying it by pi (AWG = πr²). The smaller the number is, the thicker the cable will be.

    Stranded wire is also commonly referred to using AWG, but it a little more complex. Because standard cables are made using multiple wires instead of a single solid core, they can be given multiple numbers. For example, a c

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  4. Ethernet Cables

    Ethernet is one of the most common types of cables, used to connect devices like computers and routers to the Internet. The end of an ethernet cable, an RJ45 connector, looks similar to the end of a phone cable, an RJ12, but bigger. While phone cables have four to six wires on the inside, ethernet cables use eight. Ethernet cables come in both solid and stranded variants.

    Ethernet Categories

    There are a few different variations of ethernet, the foremost being the cable category. This type of cable is abbreviated as “Cat#”, with higher numbers being newer versions of ethernet capable of faster signal speeds. These categories are defined by the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE).

    Cat5e

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  5. Cable Jackets

    There are a few key terms that apply to all cables, one of the main ones being the type of jacket a cable uses. The jacket is the exterior of the cable and can be made from a variety of materials. It is important to ensure that any cable has the appropriate jacket for the location it will be installed.

    PVC

    PVC (Polyvinyl Chloride), also called CMR (Communications Multipurpose, Riser), cable is the most common cable jacket. This is the type of jacket on a standard cable that you could find off-the-shelf at a store. They are designed with a degree of fire resistance to stop flames from traveling along the cables and spreading through buildings in the event of an emergency. Beyond that, PVC has no special features.

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  6. Solid vs. Stranded Cables

    Some types of cables can be either solid or stranded. These terms both refer to the metal core at the center of the cable and are options for ethernet cables as well as some coax cables. Solid cables are made from solid metal while stranded cables are made of many hair-thin strands that are woven together. Each version has a number of advantages and disadvantages over the other.

    Solid

    Solid cables have a core made from a single metal line, typically copper or copper-clad steel. It is the more common of than stranded, being less costly. The single, thick strand of metal is more resistant to damage such as corrosion and makes the cables easy to manufacture. This also renders them more compact, allowing solid cables to be thinner than their stranded counterparts. Despite being thinner, the solid core makes solid cables less flexible

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  7. Digital Lighting Management (DLM) Cables

    What is Digital Lighting Management?

    Digital Lighting Management (DLM) is a new, innovative system designed to maximize energy savings in each and every room of any building. In the state of California, DLM is now required to keep buildings up to code. This system will not only meet state codes but exceed their requirements to save energy costs on any electrically powered equipment.

    The cables used for DLM, called Lighting Control Cables, are compatible with a variety of devices, from wall switches to occupancy sensors, to ensure the individuals using the devices are contributing towards your energy savings just as much as your new lighting control cables and DLM system. Even in areas where state codes have not implemented this requirement yet, installing this system now will optimize your energy savings even sooner.

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