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displayport

  1. DisplayPort Questions Explained – Cable FAQ Guide

    What is DisplayPort?

    DisplayPort (left in the image above) is a 20-pin digital video cable developed by the Video Electronics Standards Association (VESA). It is one of the most advanced cables on the market today and was specifically designed for use with computer monitors.

    What is Mini DisplayPort?

    Mini DisplayPort (right in the image above) is a downsized version of DisplayPort that is used on devices too small to fit a standard DisplayPort.

    What is Thunderbolt?

    Thunderbolt is an off-shoot of Mini DisplayPort developed by Intel & Apple most commonly seen on Apple products. While Thunderbolt and Mini DisplayPort look the same, Thunderbolt is much more advanced. Mini DisplayPort is not forward compatible with Thunderbolt, but Thunderbolt is backward compatible with Mini Displayport.

    What is DisplayPort 1.2?

    DisplayPort 1.2

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  2. What are DisplayPort Cables?

    DisplayPort is the latest and greatest audio/video cable available today. While it does have many similarities with HDMI, DisplayPort is even more powerful. Whereas HDMI was designed as a multi-purpose cable capable of working with any and all electronics, DisplayPort was specifically created with computer monitors in mind. Capable of supporting HD video at even higher resolutions than HDMI, there is no better choice than DisplayPort when cable quality is your primary concern.

    DisplayPort Specifications

    The original DisplayPort cable, version 1.0, was developed by VESA (Video Electronics Standards Association) and introduced in May 2006. Since then, several newer versions with various improvements have been developed and replaced their older counterparts. Many DisplayPort cables on the market are not marked with a version number, so knowing the age of the cable is the best way to tell how well it performs. These days, users would be unlikely to come across a cable older than version 1.2. This was the first version of DisplayPort to fully outshine HDMI, being capable of supporting higher maximum bandwidth.

    Like HDMI, DisplayPort is capable of supporting audio/video instead of being video-only like many of its competitors. Despite these differences, DisplayPort connections can be adapted to other video formats including HDMI, DVI, and VGA. This can be done with an adapter cable or independent adapters can

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  3. Connecting Multiple Computer Monitors

    Office tasks and activities at home alike frequently require users to have more than one window open on their computer screen. Clicking back and forth between these windows on one screen is an option, but that becomes tedious rather quickly. Setting up a desktop or laptop with multiple displays makes multitasking much easier. It may sound simple to set up additional monitors, but there is a bit of forethought that goes into the process.

    How Do I Connect Multiple Monitors?

    Start by checking the back of the computer and look for the ports to see what kind of video connections the machine has. This could include HDMI, DisplayPort, DVI, VGA, and more. On a desktop, one of these should already be in use for the existing monitor. Laptops frequently feature an extra video port for dual monitor set-ups. If you do not have an extra video port, a USB adapter can be used instead.

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  4. HDMI vs. DisplayPort vs. DVI vs. VGA: What’s the Difference?

    There are a variety of different cables that can be used for video connections. While there have been industry efforts at streamlining, even today there are multiple options on the market. Each type of video cable is easily identified by its unique size and shape, but there are also differences when it comes to the quality of each cable signal. Knowing these differences can enable users to make educated choices when selecting cables for electronic devices.

    Current Version

    Analog/Digital

    Max Resolution

    Locking Connector

    Bandwidth

    HDMI

    2.0

    Digital

    4k (3840 x 2160)

    Optional

    18.0 Gbit/s

    DisplayPort

    1.2

    Digital

    4k (3840 x 2160)

    No

    21.6 Gbit/s

    DVI-D single-link

    Single-link

    Digital

    1920 x 1080

    Yes

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  5. Spring Cleaning: Cables to Keep (Or Not)

    Cables to Keep Around the House

    Spring is here and a lot of us are going to use that nicer weather to get a little cleaning done. If your house is anything like everyone else's, there is probably a junk drawer somewhere with a big mess of old cables. After untangling all the knots, you will want to look at each cable to see what you should keep and what can be tossed.

    Keep: Micro USB 2.0

    Micro USB is better known as a “phone charger” since they are mostly used for Android phones. Not to mention tablets, streaming devices, smart speakers, and more. Micro USB is not going anywhere anytime soon, so keeping a few extras around is a good idea right now.

    Keep: Micro USB 3.0

    This upgraded Micro USB is mostly used for external hard drives. Some cell phones use these for charging cables too. While not as widespread as the older 2.0 version, this is new enough that hanging onto one or two of them is worth it.

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  6. History of Video Cables

    Many electronics have to be connected to a monitor before you can use them. Even devices with their own screens like smartphones and laptops have that option so users have the option of using bigger displays like televisions and projectors. Over the years, many new video cables been introduced and gradually replace the old as technology continues to grow. Modern high-def TVs have come a long way from the black and white TVs of old.

    1956: Composite RCA is introduced, becoming a common standard for televisions, VCRs, LaserDisc, video game consoles, computers, and more for the next several decades. Each cable can only send a single signal, paving the way for multi-signal cables to eventually replace RCA in the future.

    1979: S-Video is released as a superior (for its time) alternative to composite RCA. It is included on VCRs, home computers, and some early video game consoles up through the early 90s.

    1987: VGA was initially created by IBM for their x86 machines. It worked so well that VGA went on to become an industry standard on computers, televisions, projectors, and other electronics. Over time, it becomes the most successful and longest lasting analog connector.

    1990s: Component RCA, an upgrade to composite, is developed. While powerful for an analog cable, it has little time to catch on before digital cables start becoming the new standard.

    1999

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  7. Computer Monitors – Cables and Cords

    Hooking up a computer monitor is not terribly complicated but there are a few different types of cables that can be used to get the job done. Before even purchasing a monitor, start by checking the computer itself. Look at the back to the machine to see what kind of video ports are on there. Ideally, you will want the same type of connection on the monitor and computer. If you find yourself with a mismatching monitor and computer, you can use an adapter or converter to change one type of connection to another.

    When making your selection, there are five main types of connections built onto modern monitors: VGA, DVI, HDMI, DisplayPort, and USB.

    VGA

    VGA (also called HD15) is an older type of video-only connection. Many used or outdated monitors will have this type of connection while newer models probably will not. VGA is the old standard for monitors and has since been replaced with newer formats. Out of all the monitor connections still in use today, VGA is the only one that is purely analog. This means VGA has a maximum resolution of 640 x 480, a far cry from the 1080p quality available with digital connections. Generally, users only want to use

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  8. Audio & Video Cables

    Audio and video cables go hand-in-hand, often being paired together. Some cables can even transmit audio and video on just one line. Over time a lot of new audio and video cables have been introduced, so the cable you need will often depend on the age of the equipment you are using. Most TVs, computers, and other devices can use multiple types of audio and video connections, so it is good to be able to identify them and know your options.

    Audio-only cables include:

    • 3.5mm
    • 2.5mm
    • ¼”
    • Optical Toslink
    • XLR
    • SpeakOn
    • MIDI

    Video-only cables include:

    • S-Video
    • DB9
    • VGA
    • DVI

    Audio/video cables include:

    • F-type
    • BNC
    • RCA
    • Component
    • HDMI
    • DisplayPort

    Audio-only

    3.5mm

    3.5mm, also called ⅛” cables, is one of the most common audio cables. They are sometimes called “headphone jacks”, being the type of connection used for headphones. These ports are frequently found on cell phones, computers, and televisions.

    There are a few different versions of 3.5mm: TS, TRS, and TRRS. TS cables will have one ring, dividing the metal sections into two conductors and are most often used for mono connections like microphones. TRS has two rings to give it three conductors, allowing them to be used for stereo connections such as speakers. TRRS has three rings for four conductors to support stereo aud

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