coax

  1. Surge Protectors

    Surge protectors are a simple way to protect electronics from electrical damage. Power surges can range anywhere from small impulses that gradually wear equipment down to lightning strikes that could fry everything electrical in an entire building. Not all surge protectors are equal and it is important to know the different features offered before selecting one.

    Surge Protectors vs. Power Strips

    The terms “surge protector” and “power strip” are often used interchangeably, but they are not the same thing. A power strip is anything that plugs into a single wall outlet and gives it multiple outlets. Not every single power strip out there has surge protection built into it. If a power strip is priced especially low, it most likely does not have any form of surge protection. While these can be used for add

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  2. Crimp Tools

    Crimp tools, also called crimpers, are used to crimp connectors onto bare wire when assembling a cable. There are a few different versions of crimp tools, depending on how the crimper is made and what type of cable it was designed for.

    How Do Crimp Tools Work?

    Using a crimp tool is fairly simple. First, a cable must be stripped to expose the metal wire inside. Then the metal wire(s) are inserted into the connector. Single conductor cables (coax) are easier to use than multi-wire cables like ethernet or phone lines (additional details below). Once the wires are inserted, put the connector inside the crimp tool and squeeze the handle. The pressure applied by the crimper will tighten the connector to keep it in place.

    Manual vs. Ratchet Crimpers

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  3. Coaxial (Coax) Connectors

    Along with the many types of coax cables there are to pick from, there is also an assortment of different coax connectors. When selecting a connector, you need to make sure you select one rated for the cable you are assembling. The back end of the connector that attaches to the coax cable needs to be the right size for installation. If the connector is too small, it will not fit. If it is too big, the connector will not secure properly and can be pulled off or even just fall off.

    The type of connector you need will be determined by the equipment used with the coax cable. A television coax connection, for example, uses an F-type connector as the industry standard. Not every connector can be used with every type of coax cable, but all types of coax cables do support multiple types of connectors.

    Every

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  4. Coax (Coaxial) Cables

    Coax (coaxial) cable is one of the oldest types of cables, having been in use for over 100 years. Like ethernet, coax cables come in both solid and stranded versions, although they are usually solid. Only a few types of coax, namely RG58 and RG8, are available as stranded.

    Most coax cables fall into one of two categories, RG (Radio Guide) and LMR. No one is 100% sure what LMR actually stands for. It could stand for a term, someone’s name, or just be random letters. There are many rumors and theories for what LMR may mean but nobody really knows for sure.

    RG cables are labeled “RG#” with the number formerly standing for the diameter of the cable. For example, RG59 cable originally had a diameter of .059”. While these measurements have changed over the years, the names of the cables have stuck. There are many types o

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  5. ShowMeCables Now Carrying Top-of-the-Line Coax Connectors and Adapters from Pasternack

    ShowMeCables is proud to announce a new addition to our inventory: coax connectors and adapters from Pasternack. Pasternack is an industry expert specializing in RF and Microwave components with a strong focus on quality above all else.

    Pasternack’s items are among the highest quality available, being RoHS and REACH Certified. Each connector is constructed using nickel-plated brass with gold-plated beryllium copper pins and built to withstand temperatures from -85°F to 329°F (-65°C to 165°C). Some units are also available in gold plati

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  6. Cable Jackets

    There are a few key terms that apply to all cables, one of the main ones being the type of jacket a cable uses. The jacket is the exterior of the cable and can be made from a variety of materials. It is important to ensure that any cable has the appropriate jacket for the location it will be installed.

    PVC

    PVC (Polyvinyl Chloride), also called CMR (Communications Multipurpose, Riser), cable is the most common cable jacket. This is the type of jacket on a standard cable that you could find off-the-shelf at a store. They are designed with a degree of fire resistance to stop flames from traveling along the cables and spreading through buildings in the event of an emergency. Beyond that, PVC has no special features.

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  7. Solid vs. Stranded Cables

    Some types of cables can be either solid or stranded. These terms both refer to the metal core at the center of the cable and are options for ethernet cables as well as some coax cables. Solid cables are made from solid metal while stranded cables are made of many hair-thin strands that are woven together. Each version has a number of advantages and disadvantages over the other.

    Solid

    Solid cables have a core made from a single metal line, typically copper or copper-clad steel. It is the more common of than stranded, being less costly. The single, thick strand of metal is more resistant to damage such as corrosion and makes the cables easy to manufacture. This also renders them more compact, allowing solid cables to be thinner than their stranded counterparts. Despite being thinner, the solid core makes solid cables less flexible

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